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mim akter
Apr 27, 2022
In Music Forum
Processing information Industry Email List with a decision scheme Like many productivity consultants, Reijneveld also advises that you periodically process all inboxes (mail, chat, messages, phone calls, notes you have made) and add them to a number of lists (project list, agenda and to-do list). Then those lists are complete and Industry Email List up-to-date again and you can choose what to do from an overview and control. The approach and decision-making scheme are almost identical to what David Allen in his classic Getting Things Done. The art of stress-free productivity ' presents. An adjustment that Reijneveld proposes is not to ask Industry Email List yourself with all the input whether there is an action for you, but whether you want to take an action for it this week. Everything after this week is 'later/maybe'. Personally I wouldn't do that. Even if your to-do list gets long if Industry Email List you ask the question 'do you want to do something with it?' without restrictions. Such a long but complete to-do list shows what you want to do and what you have said 'yes' to. This can be confronting, but it can also help you to say 'no' more often and to make better choices within everything you want to do. The one-week filter may hide the fact that you've said too much "yes." This can lead to more short-term choices than choosing from overview. In a training I give, a complete to-do list with Industry Email List dozens of tasks is often a scare. But a relevant scare. And a good starting point for making real choices and not working too pragmatically. In addition, you choose in your 'weekly maintenance' and your 'day start' what you want to do at least that week and day and you only have to see a part of that list. But zooming out in the 'weekly Industry Email List maintenance' and looking at everything you want to do provides more overview than planning and doing tasks while working. Brain laws and 10 rules Reijneveld summarizes various authors (Compernolle, Allen, Newport, Baumeister) on the brain, focus and productivity in five brain rules. If you take into account how your brain works, you prevent stress or overstrain and make optimal use of that powerful tool. Switch as little as possible. Your brain needs breaks. Great ideas come at awkward times. Your Industry Email List mind is for thinking and not for remembering things. You have a limited amount of willpower. Useful and relevant insights that become concrete, for example with a series of recommendations on the usefulness of breaks for your brain.
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